Testing electronic voltage regulators

Is there a way of testing a electronic voltage regulator other than trying another know worker.This is the stand alone one (small plastic body type with 3 connections that replaces the large metal bodied Bosch one fitted to loads of Guzzi’s and Bmw’s. I am NOT talking about the combined regulator/rectifier( although the values MAY be the same).Reason i ask is i fitted a new new electronic regulator and it was putting out up to 17 volts and when a replacment was sent that was the same! On putting the very old metal bodied Bosch back on it was putting out 13.7+ volts which my new battery was eternaly grateful for.

The only way to test them is the way you’ve done it, with a multimeter.Is that 17 volts with the battery in circuit? i. e. with a load on the alternator? If so then I would stick with the old one as that voltage will fry most of your electrics fairly quickly.Regards,John

I was wondering if there were any resitance readings between the 3 terminals that i could check with a multimeter ?. It seems strange that i have 2 brand new electronic regulators ( Durite Made in W Germany so they are old stock) which appear to be faulty. I have no intension of useing these and have put the old Bosch elctro/mechanical one back on.

I’ve used high-output police-spec electronic voltage regulators on three airhead BMWs now - all put out a consistent 14.2 volts, starting from low revs, and are very reliable. Not cheap, though…
MotorWorks part no. ELA44410:
http://www.motorworks.co.uk/vlive/Shop/Parts.php?T=5&NU=15&M=20&Ct=IA&SbCt=BA_15_20_IA_05&spPage=2



If it’s electronic, I doubt it, or not any that will make much sense anyway.

Can’t find Durite regs matching Moto Guzzi on Google or eBay, are you sure they were for a bike? Car charging systems have much higher electrical currents involved, which may be the reason for the high Voltage

Reason for edit: text too small
Mike H2012-06-16 12:19:47

17 volts is far too high for any 12V battery, whether fitted in a bike, car or truck.

Yes, I was just wondering if because it was the wrong sort of vehicle. Still can’t figure out how though

[QUOTE=Mike H] [QUOTE=ralph]I was wondering if there were any resitance readings between the 3 terminals that i could check with a multimeter ?.
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If it’s electronic, I doubt it, or not any that will make much sense anyway.
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Can’t find Durite regs matching Moto Guzzi on Google or eBay, are you sure they were for a bike? ]
 [/QUOTE]

These Durite are a direct replacement for the Guzzi and are the correct replacement for the original electromechanical Bosch.As there old stock thats probaly why you can’t find on ebay or goggle although there are some of a different make presently on ebay.They are /were used on many makes of cars including BMW ,volkswagen. I’m just wondering if it was a bad batch, like i said in my original posting they are old stock but new.

Well, as you say, dunno!

There might be a way of testing, but would need a variable power supply, then see where the output turns on and off, but just guessing as I’ve ever tried it. But if you can’t adjust the regulator you’re no further forward.

Thanks .I am sending the regs back anyway as there not doing what there supposed to do. It was only out of curiosity about testing them. I thought 1 faulty ok but 2!. Am going back to the old electromechanical one as that works.

Any help? http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=16730&st=15&p=179891&hl=diode&fromsearch=1&#entry179891

That is interesting; also you could get erroneous high Voltage if there is resistance in the ground reference connection, might make the electonics think the o/p Voltage is lower than it really is.

The earth on the reg (D-) go’s direct to the battery. The MAIN earth wire is 16mm2 well over the top i know and bolted to the gearbox. The earth system could not be better.ralph2012-06-18 18:30:27

It occurs to me that another issue could cause this.
You will have a battery voltage sensing input to the reg, normally switched through the ignition. If this has a high resistance connection in it, then the regulator will think that the battery volts are low, and will up the voltage, though why it should be capable of reaching 17v I really don’t know.
You should be able to check the voltage from the battery via the ign sw. at the regulator and compare it with direct battery volts. Both should be the same.

I have just checked ( non running)and the difference is only 0.1v with all the bulbs that should be lit removed.

That isn’t how it normally works, it has its own output from the rectifier and compares that to ground directly. Ign just does ign and lights etc.

Is it possible those Durite electronic regs were simply connected up wrong?

It’s how it works on many electronic regulators Mike. However it’s clearly academic anyway.

I had a rr45 electronic unit on the kettle and was charging at 16.5 volts it took me ages to hind out the cause and it was the sensing wire where it was connected in the loom (as per instructions) it was on the same wires as the coils and when in use the voltag was 11 volts so that was causing the overcharging , i simply used the same wire to feed a relay then linked the sensing wire to the switch contact that then went direct to battery , cured it in a instant

[QUOTE=Ex smokingbiker] I had a rr45 electronic unit on the kettle and was charging at 16.5 volts it took me ages to hind out the cause and it was the sensing wire where it was connected in the loom (as per instructions) it was on the same wires as the coils and when in use the voltag was 11 volts so that was causing the overcharging , i simply used the same wire to feed a relay then linked the sensing wire to the switch contact that then went direct to battery , cured it in a instant
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 [/QUOTE]


Interesting but i don’t quite understand BUT i know some one who probably will. I would like to find out if the Durite regs are realy are faulty. I would have thought that if the old Bosch electro/mechanical works ok on the bike then surely the durite electronic ones that are over chargeing MUST be faulty,OR am i wrong?

the electronic units are more suseptable to low voltage on the sensor def more sensative than the mechanical ones