750 Targa air forks

Help! Does anyone know the procedure for checking the presure and charging up the air in the forks on a 750 Targa. The manual says the air must be moisature free and the presure quoted is not a scale I understand. Do I realy need to go to a dealer/service establishment to do this???

They are easy to over inflate & need a low pressure gauge. The critical thing is to balance them. Do you have a link pipe between the fork caps?
If so (and maybe if not) see how it rides. If it’s OK leave well alone.
I’m not a Luddite but there is a limit to what I’ll mess with :wink:
Bestof luck
Steve

My V35 Imola II had them. The stanchions should have been drilled just under the top yoke and have and Ali o-ring sealed sleeve either side with a link pipe between them. These sleeves were pinned in place by some tubes taking up the slack and shrouding the rest of the stanchion between the yokes.Do not exceed 12 psi. I used to run mine at between 5 and 7 psi. I used a cycle pump with a car style fitting. The volume of the forks is very small and it is very easy to over pressure hence recommend the cycle pump.I needed to maintain this at least weekly, so clinically dry air was impractical. I figure a warm garage keeps the humiidity down. The problem with the moisture is it will eventually emulisfy the fork oil, but if you cahange it regular (yearly) you won’t have a problem.

There is a balance pipe between each stanchion. Only one stanchion has a valve. The reason I have to mess with them is that the bike currently has flat bars and I am putting clip-ons back which means the top yoke has to come off and so too the balance pipe. Chances are the previous owner did the reverse and probably never recharged the forks with air. It’s got to be done and I will soon know whether there is any air presure in there.

Interesting as I did wonder that, unless the seals are perfect, they are likely to leak the compressed air even though they may be oil tight. I see also that moisture in the air will cause emulsification. I wonder if it is possible to buy canned compressed dry air with a suitable hose connection with a guauge?

The trick would be to get a regulator with a low enough volume.
You can get the nitrogen canisters out of a puncture repair kit, but like I say, controlling it.

|If you have a compressor you pop a dryer on it if not then for the amount of air in there I really doubt it will make much difference. There are cans of compressed air available Halfords have them and they do have a screw valve on top they are for the hobbyists airbrush, BUT a bike pump is the safest way to do it, less chance of blowing seals I am led to believe.

Thee forks are connected at 4 points. Getting them balanced is NOT REQUIRED.
On my LM 111 I was told they were a gimmick and ignored the air pipe.
I then had a small shunt which broke one of the connections.
Never noticed for several weeks.

I noticed the braking into the early part of a bend was much improved as the pitching was much reduced. The same was true of my Kawasaki GPz305.

With conventional brakes you could ride around this pitching by only using the rear brake in the later part of the braking. Having those phoocane link abortions, rear only braking is not possible, so maintaining the fork pressure was critical for focused riding.

I can see that the weight and resulting springing of a Mk3 Lemon might hide this, as it did with my Kawasaki GT750.

Doug Brauneck raced with all 3 brakes linked and he wasn’t bad.
We are going to just disagree on this.

This has just reminded me, last had Marzocchi Stradas on the Spada, I got their little pump like a miniature bicycle pump, then cobbled it together with a gauge from off a busted footpump. Might still have it somewhere. Weren’t half easier with the gauge showing what’s what.

I Had wondered as none of my previous bikes ever had any of this stuff. I am also struggling to believe that fork oil seals will actually privide a presure air tight seal. So, I will do the work and then see how she rides and go from there. My bet is that when I undo the link pipe, there will be a distinct lack of hiss of escaping air!

[quote=“Mike H”]This has just reminded me, last had Marzocchi Stradas on the Spada, I got their little pump like a miniature bicycle pump, then cobbled it together with a gauge from off a busted footpump. Might still have it somewhere. Weren’t half easier with the gauge showing what’s what.

Well I reckon I have all those bits somewhere i.e, a bicycle pump and a guage which wouldn’t be difficult to put together. what’s to lose so I will have a go at that.

Yep.

You will note, my only experience is on a V35 with no primary bias to the rear. If anyone wants to throw a good example of a linked brake system in my direction for a couple of hours I am prepared to give it a go, but as things stand . . . . . .

If you think about it, they all have to be whether air asisted or not. As soon as you pitch forward on the forks, you are compressing the air in them as the oil won’t.

I reckon.

[QUOTE=Cabernet]

[QUOTE=gogoguzzi]
I am also struggling to believe that fork oil seals will actually privide a presure air tight seal. [/QUOTE]
If you think about it, they all have to be whether air asisted or not. As soon as you pitch forward on the forks, you are compressing the air in them as the oil won’t. That’s true, good thinking. I have now found that the fork air presure is one Bar. I have found a low presure air gauage new for £16 on the internet and all I have to do is put some air in via a footpump then adjust with the guage fitted directly to the valve. Both forks will be equalised via the connecting pipe. Simples

Well the forks turned out to have no air in them anyway which explained why they were a bit lifeless. I put 1 bar presure in with a footpump and carefully adjusted using a dedicated low presure guage. Big difference!! I suspect I will have to monitor the air presure in the same way as we do with tyres but worth the effort. If you’re interested, the guage I bought can be ordered via the following link: http://www.langtoninfo.co.uk/showitem.aspx?isbn=0716281003714&loc=GBP

The volumn in the forks is quite low. Therefore whenever you check them you will loose pressure as the volumn of the gauge is proportionall quite large. It may appear they are loosing pressure when in actual fact you are releasing it when you dutifully maintain them. I always wanted to fit a permant gauge, but never gtrund to it. Have fun.